All posts by Gigi

.NET Core Tools Telemetry

Microsoft may be winning the hearts of developers with their open-sourcey behaviour, but their attitude towards privacy hasn’t changed at all. As if Windows 10 sending usage data to Microsoft wasn’t enough, the .NET Core toolchain does it too.

It’s called Telemetry, and the .NET Core documentation explains the extent of the data that is sent to Microsoft whenever you run a dotnet subcommand.

The problem with .NET Core’s telemetry is not so much the nature of the data that is collected, but the fact that it is done by default, and you have to opt out if you don’t want it. That’s exactly the opposite of how it should be, with many people citing problems of privacy, security, and corporate buy-in in Issue #3093 on GitHub.

The fact that the issue is still open after nearly a year shows that the quest to “improve your experience” (whatever that means) and “provide a great product” is a lot more important than your privacy.

To disable telemetry, you have to add an environment variable called DOTNET_CLI_TELEMETRY_OPTOUT and give it a value of 1. (There are other valid values, such as “true”.) If you follow the instructions and set it in cmd.exe (Windows) or export it in a Terminal window (Linux), as the official documentation suggests, that setting is only valid for the active command line window! Instead, follow the instructions below to set the environment variable permanently.

Opting Out Under Windows

Under Windows, go to Advanced System Settings (via Control Panel or directly from the Start menu) and add it to the environment variables from there.

Opting Out Under Linux

Under Linux, you can permanently set environment variables either by editing the script file for the shell you’re using (e.g. .bashrc for Bash), or else adding an entry in /etc/environment which will apply to all shells as well as non-shell windows:

echo "DOTNET_CLI_TELEMETRY_OPTOUT=1" | sudo tee -a /etc/environment

You will need to restart the system for this change to take effect.

Opting Out Under Mac

I don’t have a Mac, so all I can tell you is to get a decent OS. ūüėČ

Seriously though, the same instructions for Linux should presumably work on a Mac.

On Overbookings

“I never understood how overbooking is legal. (I know this wasn’t really an overbooking incident, and I know about the no-show excuse. But if you buy tickets for a cinema, or a theatre, or book a place in a restaurant, or whatever, they never tell you “Sorry, but we gave your place to someone else. Here’s a cookie.”)”
— Myself in a Facebook comment, 12th April 2017

The recent incident where a passenger was violently removed from a United flight to make room for United employees reopened an old argument about overbookings on flights. While this wasn’t in itself an overbooking incident (even though some airlines like to treat “overbooking” as an umbrella term encompassing even incidents like this), it reminded me of¬†the intentional practice of overbooking, which is not just a desperate measure by abysmal airlines like Air Malta, but indeed a blight that plagues the greater majority of the airline industry.

Image credit: here

It is well-known that most airlines intentionally allow their flights to be overbooked due to statistics that state that on average, some 10-15% of booked seats result in no-shows. The excuse is that the seat left empty could instead be used to transport a passenger who does show up. This is obviously a slap in the face of the people who, conversely, do show up for their seat and are denied boarding because the flight was overbooked, and offered measly compensation for it.

If you make a booking at a restaurant, cinema, theatre, etc, they never tell you “Sorry, but we gave your place to someone else. Here’s a cookie.” You booked a place, and they are supposed to respect it. Of course, you might not show up, and that’s a risk on them.

But in the case of flights, you pay for them in advance. Whether you show up or not, you actually paid for that seat. It’s yours. How is it even legal to sell that same seat a second time to someone else? It’s like selling the same item at a store to two different people, have both pay for it, expect the losing party to actually ask for his money back (and keep it if they don’t), and let them just live with the disappointment.

I am really furious not only that airlines carry out this sleazy practice, but also that the authorities allow it to happen. Even worse, the compensation (at least here in Europe) is pathetic. It barely makes up for lost time at work, and has absolutely no consideration about stress and hassles that take place as a result, including the eventuality of having to cancel holiday plans, miss connecting flights, and run after airlines for compensation. As I had already noted in my article about when Air Malta left us stranded, not only is the compensation not enough disincentive to leave passengers at the airport, but it actually makes it worth the risk for the airlines.

I’m sorry, but you just cannot justify this sort of gross mistreatment of customers by quoting passenger statistics and airline profits.

Setting up .NET Core on Linux

One of the biggest promises of .NET Core is the long-awaited promise of true cross-platform development. In this article, we’ll see how we can set up .NET Core on some flavours of Linux, and ensure that it works by running a simple console application.

Introduction

In general, if you want to run .NET Core on Linux, you should do the following before even starting development, to make sure it actually works:

  1. Install .NET Core itself.
  2. Create a simple .NET project.
  3. Build and run the application.

The steps to install .NET Core vary depending on the distribution you are using. Different distributions use different package managers (e.g. APT, RPM, YUM, DNF, etc) so you will often need to either add a .NET package source to your package manager’s configuration, or download binaries for .NET Core from Microsoft, before you can proceed to actually install .NET Core.

Microsoft’s Getting Started with .NET Core documentation lists a handful of supported Linux distributions, each with their own installation instructions. Unfortunately, this is not yet updated with the latest¬†versions of several popular distributions. In fact, I have not been able to set up .NET Core in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Fedora 25, or CentOS 7. So in this article, we’ll focus on Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) and Linux Mint 18.1.

Unfortunately, these two are both Debian flavours, and both use the Ubuntu package server, so there is not much in the way of variety here. ¬†In any case, let’s proceed with the setup.

Installing .NET Core on Linux Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak)

First, we need to follow the installation instructions in the documentation in order to add the .NET package source to APT’s package source configuration:

sudo sh -c 'echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://apt-mo.trafficmanager.net/repos/dotnet-release/ yakkety main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/dotnetdev.list'
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 417A0893
sudo apt-get update

Here’s what the output of most of this should look like:

With that done, we can install the .NET Core SDK:

sudo apt-get install dotnet-dev-1.0.1

Once the installation is complete, we can create and run a simple project. We can do this without writing any code ourselves, because the dotnet command provides means of generating project templates out of the box.

First, let’s create a directory for our application, and switch to it (note: the documentation provides an alternative way of doing this):

mkdir hello
cd hello

Then, we can create a simple “Hello World” console application in the current directory by running the following command:

dotnet new console

Then, with the following commands, we restore dependencies via NuGet, build the application, and run it:

dotnet restore
dotnet run

Here’s the output, so you can see that it actually worked:

Installing .NET Core on Linux Mint 18.1

The same documentation page with the instructions to install .NET Core on Ubuntu also covers Linux Mint 17. Unfortunately, this doesn’t work for Linux Mint 18. However, you’ll notice that Ubuntu 14.04 and Linux Mint 17 share the same setup instructions. And this Stack Overflow answer shows that Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18 also use the same setup. Thus:

sudo sh -c 'echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://apt-mo.trafficmanager.net/repos/dotnet-release/ xenial main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/dotnetdev.list'

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 417A0893

sudo apt-get update

Then, like before, we install the .NET Core SDK:

sudo apt-get install dotnet-dev-1.0.1

And then, we can actually test this out:

mkdir hello
cd hello
dotnet new console
dotnet restore
dotnet run

We get our “Hello World”, so it works!

Conclusion

We’ve seen how to set up .NET Core on the Ubuntu and Mint distributions of Linux, which are very similar. Different distributions have different setup instructions, and it would be a real pain to cover all of them. The official documentation does provide installation instructions for a handful of popular distributions, but they are slow to update documentation, and do not at this time cover the latest versions.

At least, however, this should be enough to get an idea of what it takes to set things up and run a simple application on Linux using .NET Core.

Playing a WAV File Using SDL2

Sound effects and music are fundamental in giving life to a game. In this article, we’re going to see how we can play a simple WAV file using just the native SDL2 Audio APIs. Unfortunately these APIs are very tricky to use, and the documentation is littered with incoherent examples and legacy function calls. For this reason, most people prefer to use the SDL_mixer extension library to handle sound and music.

The source code for this article is available at the Gigi Labs BitBucket repository. It includes a sample WAV file generated with Bfxr. You will need to copy the WAV file into the output directly (along with SDL2.dll) before running the program.

While error handling has been omitted in this article for conciseness, checking the output of each SDL2 function call and showing something in case of error (e.g. using SDL_ShowSimpleMessageBox()) will save you a lot of hair-ripping experiences.

In order to use audio in SDL2, the first thing we need to do is initialise the audio subsystem when we initialise SDL2 itself:

SDL_Init(SDL_INIT_AUDIO);

We can play simple sound effects in SDL2 by loading and playing a WAV file. We can load a WAV file by calling SDL_LoadWAV(), passing in arguments which it will populate with data read from the WAV file:

	// load WAV file

	SDL_AudioSpec wavSpec;
	Uint32 wavLength;
	Uint8 *wavBuffer;

	SDL_LoadWAV("Powerup5.wav", &wavSpec, &wavBuffer, &wavLength);

The next thing we need to do is get a handle on our audio device, which is a fancy way of saying speakers (or headphones, or whatever).

	// open audio device

	SDL_AudioDeviceID deviceId = SDL_OpenAudioDevice(NULL, 0, &wavSpec, NULL, 0);

You’ll notice we have a bunch of arguments, and for most of them we aren’t really caring about the details and passing in NULL or 0 to get reasonable defaults. Below is a summary of what each argument does; feel free to skip it if you just want to get something up and running quickly.

  • The first argument is the name of the audio device you want to open. While you might have several, passing in NULL will give you a reasonable default audio device. You can, however, use this to explicitly name a device you want to use – see SDL_OpenAudioDevice() documentation for more detail.
  • The second argument is relevant to recording devices, and we don’t care about it for playback.
  • The third argument represents the desired audio output format. We already got this information when we read the WAV file.
  • If provided, the fourth argument will be populated with the actual output format of the audio device. In our case, we don’t care, and can pass NULL.
  • The fifth argument is for advanced scenarios and we don’t need it either.

Now that we have a handle on the audio device, we can actually play something:

	// play audio

	int success = SDL_QueueAudio(deviceId, wavBuffer, wavLength);
	SDL_PauseAudioDevice(deviceId, 0);

SDL_QueueAudio is a handy function available since SDL 2.0.4 (at the time of writing this article, the current stable version is 2.0.5) that lets you send WAV (audio) data to the audio device without having to register callback functions (which is what you’d otherwise have to do).

SDL_PauseAudioDevice() is used to pause/unpause audio playback on the audio device (depending on the value of the second parameter). By passing 0 as the second parameter, we are enabling playback (i.e. unpausing the audio device), and this allows the sound to be played.

Let’s add a small delay so that we can hear the sound before the application exits:

	// keep application running long enough to hear the sound

	SDL_Delay(3000);

Finally, let’s remember to clean up after ourselves before exiting the application:

	// clean up

	SDL_CloseAudioDevice(deviceId);
	SDL_FreeWAV(wavBuffer);
	SDL_Quit();

	return 0;

We can now run the application, and should hear the sound play if everything is set up correctly. If not, then:

  • Remember to have both SDL2.dll (if running under Windows) and the WAV file in the output directory.
  • Make sure the path to the WAV file is set correctly. If running under Visual Studio, you may also need to change the Working Directory project setting. See the last part of “Setting up SDL2 with Visual Studio 2015” for instructions on how to do this.
  • Add error handling logic, as suggested at the beginning of this article.

Multi-Targeting .NET Standard Class Libraries

The .NET family has grown quite a bit, and to be honest, it’s a bit of a confusing mess. As I already explained in “Migrating Dandago.Finance to .NET Core“, there are now several different types of class library you can choose from (including different kinds of portable class libraries), different ideas of cross-platform (.NET Core vs Universal Windows Platform), different frameworks, and .NET Standard.

Let’s consider the following image, which shows three different .NET-based frameworks in relation to .NET Standard:

Image credit: .NET Core, .NET Framework, Xamarin ‚Äď The “WHAT and WHEN to use it”

Your applications will typically be built for one of the frameworks on top (e.g. .NET Framework). But when you create a class library, you can choose to have it target a specific framework, or .NET Standard. Just as a quick recap from¬†“Migrating Dandago.Finance to .NET Core“, targeting a particular framework (e.g. .NET Core) will not let you use the class library on others (e.g. .NET Framework), but targeting .NET Standard keeps it compatible with all of them.

This means that class libraries that target .NET Standard have maximum compatibility, but there’s a cost: not all APIs are available for .NET Standard,¬†and¬†targeting .NET Standard is only compatible with certain recent versions of those frameworks. If you take a look at the compatibility chart, you’ll notice for instance that .NET Standard 1.3¬† supports .NET Framework 4.6 and onwards.

For the most part, this is okay. But sometimes, you may want to combine .NET Standard compatibility with specific features in a particular framework, or perhaps target .NET Standard but still support older versions of a framework because you have some legacy code you can’t upgrade yet.

Multi-Targeting

When you create a new .NET Standard Class Library, its .csproj file will look something like this:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netstandard1.4</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>

</Project>

It is now actually possible to target multiple frameworks, by changing the <TargetFramework> element to <TargetFrameworks> (just add an ‘s’) and putting in different target framework monikers separated by semicolons. For instance, the .csproj file for my .NET Settings Framework looks like this:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFrameworks>netstandard1.2;net452</TargetFrameworks>
    <!-- ... -->
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup Condition="'$(TargetFramework)' == 'net452'">
    <Reference Include="System.Configuration" />
  </ItemGroup>

  <ItemGroup Condition="'$(TargetFramework)' == 'netstandard1.2'">
    <PackageReference Include="System.ComponentModel.TypeConverter" Version="4.3.0" />
  </ItemGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration" Version="1.1.1" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Binder" Version="1.1.1" />
  </ItemGroup>

</Project>

In this project, I’m targeting .NET Standard to provide as much compatibility as possible, but I’m also using framework-specific assets from the .NET Framework (namely System.Configuration, which is used to work with App.config/Web.config files). Thus, I am targeting both .NET Standard 1.2+ and .NET 4.5.2+. This has the effect of creating separate builds for each framework.

I have dependencies in there that are applicable for both targets (the section at the end with no conditions), but I also have specific dependencies needed for each framework. For instance, the functionality that needs System.Configuration will only be available for the build that targets the full .NET Framework, and will not be usable in the .NET Standard build. Such functionality will have to be written within preprocessor directives to prevent them from breaking the other builds:

#if NET452

using System.Configuration;

// ...

#endif

Unfortunately, as of now, you have to edit the .csproj by hand if you want to do multi-targeting, because the Visual Studio tooling hasn’t quite caught up with it yet. In fact, the project settings will only allow you to target a specific version of .NET Standard from a dropdown:

And after you’ve edited the .csproj by hand, it won’t let you change it from the GUI:

Summary

  • Targeting .NET Core lets you go cross platform, but you can’t use that functionality with other frameworks.
  • Targeting .NET Standard is compatible with any framework that supports that version of .NET Standard.
  • You can multi-target a .NET Standard library to include framework-specific functionality (guarded with preprocessor directives) while keeping the rest of the library compatible with all the relevant frameworks.

Split Code Window in Visual Studio

This is another of those little things that are right there and yet many people seem to not know about them.

There’s a little handle at the top-right corner of the code window:

When you drag it down, it will split your code window into two parts:

This is very useful when you want to look at two different places within the same code file (e.g. while examining one method, check another one declared earlier in the same file).

At any time, you can drag the splitter in the middle all the way to the top to go back to single view.

The Broken Web of March 2017

This article is the March 2017 issue of the monthly series that started with “The Sorry State of the Web in 2016“, showing all kinds of blunders on websites ranging from the silly to the insecure and illegal.¬†While I spot a good number of these myself, many are brought to my attention by contributors, and I would like to thank them all.

JobsPlus

JobsPlus, which is the ridiculous new name for what used to be ETC, had launched a new website as part of their rebranding.

Despite that, their content still can’t handle apostrophes, not to mention basic¬†formatting such as bulleted lists:

At least, it was built with internationalisation in mind. In fact, you can choose a language…

…with a single selection of English. That’s very useful indeed!

JobsPlus also have a service where they send a daily email with all new vacancies. Typically there are no new vacancies during weekends, but they still send an empty email. This has been going on for around 10 years if not more (formerly as ETC, of course).

Henley Malta

The Henley MBA might teach you many useful things, but building a basic website is definitely not one of these!

In fact, here are two basic things you should never have on your website:

  1. Broken images
  2. Misleading links that unexpectedly open your email application.

Just Some Coding

The only thing worse than a misleading link is something that looks like a link but is not, as you can see on Just Some Coding Ltd‘s website.

There are many ways to emphasise text on the web, but underlining is not a good one. Underlining is usually associated with a link, so when you see big green underlined text like “art” or¬†“functional”, the typical user might try to click on it, only to realise that it’s not actually a link.

Maypole

Maypole is yet another website insecurely accepting credit card information:

Secured by Thawte indeed, but there’s no padlock. We’ve been through this several times before and I won’t bore you by repeating the details, but refer back to “The Sorry State of the Web in 2016”¬†if you don’t understand why this is bad.

MFSA Registry

Let’s also welcome the MFSA Registry¬†into the the realm of oft-repeated security issues, in this case that of having an untrusted SSL certificate:

As if that wasn’t enough, the same website also accepts login details over an insecure connection:

Bank Cross-Origin Issue

I recently caught some functionality in a local bank’s webite that was completely broken because of this cross-origin problem:

That’s not nice to have in a production environment.

Owner’s Best

Owner’s Best recently launched a new website, and not without issues. Until the time of writing this article, you can still see “Error: Rows Not Set” at the bottom of the page:

At one time, I was checking out a particular property, and they have these buttons on the side where you can see the floor plan and other details:

When clicking one of these buttons, however, I was taken to this contact form:

I was really confused by the fact that this contact form came up instead of the floor plan I was expecting, and the back button wasn’t working either.

What actually happened was this: the contact form is actually right below the property detail shown in the earlier screenshot, so properties that don’t have additional info will cause those buttons to link to an empty anchor, which has the side effect of bringing the contact form to the top of the page. The least they could have done is hide the buttons if the relevant detail is not there for the current property.

Roller Blades Malta

There’s one important lesson we can take away from Roller Blades Malta: don’t enter website content when you’re drunk.

Star Web Malta

Woe be upon thee, if thou hast an invalid WoeID:

Transport Malta

We all love Transport Malta, and for those who want to actually communicate their love, they have a contact form (note also the messed up action / social media list on the side):

Unfortunately, however, they don’t want to receive your love. The contact form goes to this page:

Transport Malta also joins the list of websites that accept login details on an insecure channel:

TVM

TVM‘s website, unlike that of JobsPlus, is in both English and Maltese. However, they forgot to translate “Sign In / Register” in the Maltese version:

WhatsOn

whatson.com.mt is another website accepting login details over an insecure channel:

Before you can login or register, though, you have to get past the cookie-acceptance text that comes up in front of the login/register form. This text tells you that you have to accept cookie usage to proceed, but the site has already set cookies regardless of your acceptance.

Xamarin University

When you sign up for Xamarin University, you have to consent to Microsoft to spam you.

While they say that you can unsubscribe at any time, I don’t want Microsoft sending me trash in the first place.

I also was unable to access some of the site’s functionality, because their JavaScript was broken:

Summary

We’ve seen quite a few bad things in this article, and I have even more lined up for the April issue. As always, feel free to bring to my attention any blunders you have experienced and feel should be included.

I have summarised various points to improve upon in earlier articles, and feel there would be little benefit by repeating them in this one.

However, I just want to remind everyone why I am writing these articles: it’s not to put shame on any particular website, but to learn about the bad things on the web today and avoid repeating them in the future.¬†These experiences are painful to visitors of such websites, and embarrassing for the website developers and the companies commissioning them. Let’s all learn from our mistakes and create a better web for all!

Exception Detail Without A Variable

Here’s a scenario just about everyone has run into: you had this try/catch block:

try
{
    // ...
}
catch (Exception)
{
    // ...
}

You didn’t need the exception variable, for whatever reason. Although you’d typically leave it there in case you needed to dig deeper into the exception, you got tired of Visual Studio nagging about the unused variable, and removed it.

And then, it happened: an exception occurred, and you actually needed the detail.

As it turns out, there’s a way you can see the exception detail without adding the exception variable back and reproducing the issue a second time. There’s a special $exception variable that you can use in the Locals, Watches, or Immediate windows:

An additional benefit is that since $exception is local to the scope in which your instruction pointer is, you can check the exception detail even if you’re looking at code elsewhere in the project, without having to go back and find the exact place where your exception was thrown.

A big thanks goes to this Stack Overflow answer for this handy little tip.

A Dashboard for Microsoft Orleans

Introduction

While Microsoft Orleans has developed into a robust and scalable product over the years, the engagement between the Orleans team and the community around it is a spectacular example of the collaboration that open source projects should foster. On the one hand, the Orleans team members make themselves very available to help out with questions and issues that developers have when using Orleans. On the other hand, developers using Orleans have together built OrleansContrib, a collection of repositories adding unofficial functionality on top of what Orleans provides.

These repositories cover a variety of different areas: storage providers, logging and telemetry, documentation on design patterns, virtual meetups… and, of course, the Orleans Dashboard. This dashboard is a great way to monitor the activity of your silos and the grains within them.

Dashboard Overview

At a glance, the dashboard gives you a brief summary of your active silos, and the grain activations within them.

In the Grains section, you get an overview of the total grain activations in your silos, and a breakdown of each grain type. For each type of grain, you can see statistics on the number of activations, the rate of exceptions, throughput, and latency. In this case I haven’t actually created any grains, so all you can see are the system grains and the ones created by the Dashboard itself; however the data you see here will be a lot more interesting once you use it to monitor the activity and behaviour of your actual grains.

You can home in on an individual grain type. Aside from the statistics mentioned earlier, you also get detailed statistics on throughput, latency and failed requests per method.

At the bottom of the same page detailing a single type of grain, you can see a list of activations of that grain by silo.

Moving on, in the Silos section, you can see a summary of your active silos.

When you click on a silo, it gives you a more detailed view. At the top, you can see a graphical view showing resource utilisation: CPU, memory, and grains.

At the bottom, there are sections showing Silo Counters (number of clients, and messages sent and received), Silo Properties (information about the silo and its configuration), and a list of grain activations by type in the silo.

Adding the Dashboard to an Orleans silo

The Orleans Dashboard GitHub page explains how to set up and configure the dashboard. The first thing you need to do is install a NuGet package:

Install-Package OrleansDashboard

Then you will need to add an entry in the silo configuration to enable the dashboard. This can be done either using the XML configuration, or programmatically in code.

If you’re using a Dev/Test Host project to play with Orleans, it’s probably easier to do this in code. Find the file OrleansHostWrapper.cs, and after adding using OrleansDashboard; at the top, add the highlighted line below to register the dashboard:

            var config = ClusterConfiguration.LocalhostPrimarySilo();
            config.AddMemoryStorageProvider();
            config.Globals.RegisterDashboard();
            siloHost = new SiloHost(siloName, config);

If, on the other hand, you have a properly partitioned set of projects (as in “Getting Started with Microsoft Orleans“) and are using an OrleansConfiguration.xml file for your silo’s configuration, then just add an entry for the dashboard under the <Globals> node:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<OrleansConfiguration xmlns="urn:orleans">
  <Globals>
    <SeedNode Address="localhost" Port="11111" />
    <BootstrapProviders>
      <Provider Type="OrleansDashboard.Dashboard" Name="Dashboard" />
    </BootstrapProviders>
  </Globals>
  <Defaults>
    <Networking Address="localhost" Port="11111" />
    <ProxyingGateway Address="localhost" Port="30000" />
  </Defaults>
</OrleansConfiguration>

The dashboard runs by default at localhost:8080. If you want, you can change the port, or add basic username/password security. See the Orleans Dashboard page for an example showing how to configure these.

Summary

The Orleans dashboard is a great way to get detailed information about the silos in an Orleans cluster, and the grains within those silos. With detailed statistics like throughput, latency and failed requests, it is an invaluable tool to not only monitor the smooth operation of the cluster, but also to troubleshoot errors and performance bottlenecks.

Setting up the dashboard involves simply installing a NuGet package and then adding some very simple configuration to enable it. Additional configuration to change the port or add username/password protection is also possible.

The Orleans Dashboard homepage claims that:

“This project is alpha quality, and is published to collect community feedback.”

I’d argue that it’s pretty damn impressive for something that claims to be alpha quality.

See also: Orleans Virtual Meetup #11: A monitoring and visualisation show with Richard Astbury, Dan Vanderboom and Roger Creyke (13th October 2016).

Setting Up Elasticsearch and Kibana on Windows

Elasticsearch is fantastic to index your data so that it can be searched by its lightning-fast search engine. With Kibana, you also get the ability to analyse and visualise that data. Both of these products are provided for free by Elastic.

Installing Java Runtime Environment

Elastic products are developed in Java, so you’ll need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) to run them. Get the latest JRE from the relevant ugly Oracle downloads page. Either use the .exe installer, or download the .zip file and then extract the folder inside.

Either way, take note of the JRE folder location and add it as an environment variable. To do this, hit the start menu and type “environment variables“:

In the window that comes up, go on Environment Variables…:

You will now see the user and system environment variables. Hit New… under the System variables:

Name it JAVA_HOME, and in the value put in the path to the JRE folder (not its bin folder):

You can now OK out of the various dialog windows.

Setting up Elasticsearch

Go to the Elasticsearch product page, and hit Download:

In the next page, download the ZIP file:

Extract the folder in the .zip file somewhere.

You can now run¬†elasticsearch.bat. If you get “The syntax of the command is incorrect”, you probably didn’t set the JAVA_HOME environment variable as explained in the previous section.

elasticsearch.bat

Running this command, you should see a bunch of initialisation output:

…and if you browse to localhost:9200, you should see some JSON returned:

Now that we know it’s working, we can install it as a Windows service. So press Ctrl+C to kill the instance of Elasticsearch you just ran, and instead run:

elasticsearch-service.bat install

This should install it as a service:

This installs it as Manual startup type, and does not start it. You probably want to change that to Automatic (Delayed Start), from the Services window in Microsoft Windows, and also Start it. Once you have done that, give it a few seconds to start, and then verify again that you get a response from localhost:9200.

Setting up Kibana

Next, we will set up Kibana. Grab the Windows .zip file from the Kibana downloads page:

Extract it wherever your heart desires.

Make sure Elasticsearch is running. Then, in Kibana’s bin folder, run kibana.bat:

kibana.bat

Some text will be written to the console as Kibana is initialised, and then you should be able to go to localhost:5601 and actually get a webpage:

Now we know that it works. Let’s set it up as a service. Kill the instance we just ran using Ctrl+C first.

Oh crap, Kibana does not come with a service installer! What are we gonna do?

Enter NSSM, the Non-Sucking Service Manager, which we can use to install just about any application as a Windows service, using either the command line or an interactive GUI. After downloading NSSM, we can install Kibana as a Windows service with a command like the following from NSSM’s win64 folder:

nssm install "Kibana 5.2.2" C:\[...]\kibana-5.2.2-windows-x86\bin\kibana.bat

With an elevated command prompt, we can also configure the Windows service, such as setting the startup type and the description:

nssm set "Kibana 5.2.2" Start "SERVICE_DELAYED_AUTO_START"
nssm set "Kibana 5.2.2" Description "Kibana lets you visualize your Elasticsearch data"

Finally, we start the service:

nssm start "Kibana 5.2.2"

If all goes well:

…then we can go back to localhost:5601 and verify that it’s really running.

With that, it’s all set up. All that’s needed is an index with some data that you can use Kibana to visualise, but that’s beyond the scope of this article.