Category Archives: Rants

The Sorry State of Tourism in Ireland

I first visited Ireland around this time eight years ago, for St. Patrick’s Day 2012. It did not take me long to fall in love with the place. Since then, I have revisited Ireland other times, lived there for about a year and a half, and been around most of the country. As a result, my Irish experience has been a mixture of thrills and disappointments.

Separate hot and cold water taps (when hot water is actually available) is a disease more prevalent in Ireland than the Coronavirus.

When I recently revisited Ireland around the same time that the Coronavirus outbreak started, I once again had mixed feelings. Many things were really nice, but I wasn’t spared any disappointments.

As part of the Sorry State of the Web series, in which I promote good web development practices by illustrating bad ones, I will focus on websites (and other technology services) I came across during my research for this trip. Other things that annoyed me, such as cafes charging you an extra 2 Euros just to toast your sandwich, will be out of scope.

Aran Islands

The Aran Islands may be beautiful, but their website could have been better.

In fact, they did make it better by fixing this problem with ampersand HTML entities showing within the page.

Insecure WiFi at Penneys

Penneys, the chain of department stores that you might otherwise recognise as Primark in the UK, offers free WiFi to their customers.

Unfortunately, given that you need to join the WiFi via an endpoint that does not come with a proper SSL certificate, it is not only useless, but plain risky for customers to use.

Secret Valley Wildlife Park

The Secret Valley Wildlife Park website has a number of issues.

For starters, some of the links at the bottom (i.e. Terms & Conditions, Privacy, and Cookies) don’t work. The cursor doesn’t even turn into a pointer, and if you look at the HTML, it seems they put anchor tags without href attributes.

On the Animals page, images take ages to load because they used huge images in the page without using thumbnails (see also: The Shameful Web of April 2017 (Part 1)). If you’re including large images in a page, always use small versions and link to the larger version.

There also seems to be a problem with HTTPS… we’ll get to that too.

Going on the online booking system (which is what we care about when it comes to HTTPS, since sensitive information is involved), we see that HTTPS looks okay so far. They also used to have a test ticket type that I’m happy to see has been removed. In fact, they recently updated this page with a plea for funds since Coronavirus is messing up their business (understandably).

Unfortunately, when you proceed to the next step and are about to book a ticket, the connection suddenly isn’t secure any more. It’s a small mixed content problem because of an image, but the problem is that it undermines the trust that people have in such websites (when it comes to keeping their sensitive financial data secure), and can potentially have security-related consequences.

So while I sympathise with Secret Valley (and so many others affected by the Coronavirus), it’s also important to keep your data safe. By all means, send them money, but do it using alternative, secure means.

The M50 Toll

If you’re going to be renting a car in Dublin and using it to drive around the country, one of the things you’re going to have to do is pay the toll on the M50 motorway. The M50 uses a barrier-free toll system that can be paid online by 8pm on the next day.

While the close deadline is a little annoying, being able to pay it online is quite convenient… when it works.

In this case, the system just didn’t want to work, although I tried several times. This can happen, but what is a little worrying here is that I don’t think those details about the error (the XML-like thing) should be disclosed to the customer.

Blackrock Castle Observatory

If you like science, then Blackrock Castle Observatory is a great place to visit. They have a lot of interactive exhibits that explain concepts from astronomy and science in general:

Wait… what’s that at the bottom-right, where the arrow is pointing? Let’s take a closer look:

Uh oh… someone didn’t activate Windows! That’s quite embarrassing, and can be seen on several of their exhibits.

Wrap Up

Although Ireland will always have a special place in my heart, it hasn’t spared me any disappointments, both in terms of the service I received in various places as a tourist, but also on websites and other technology-related services.

This article, like others in the same series, is an educational exercise aimed at improving technology standards, especially on the web which so many people come in contact with. The aim is to learn from this and provide a better service, so I hope that nobody is offended, particularly in this difficult time.

Instead, I hope that in such times, when we depend on technology so much more, we can overcome these obvious problems and use technology safely and reliably to reduce the burden of living in a difficult situation as much as possible.

With the Coronavirus currently devastating health, economy, tourism and peace of mind across the world, we need to be safe, help each other, and show empathy because so many people are affected in different ways.

The Sorry State of Buying a Mobile Phone in Malta

A few years ago, I ran the Sorry State of the Web series of articles to promote good web design/development practices by pinpointing shameful ones that should be avoided (an approach inspired by Web Pages That Suck).

Websites today are very different from when Vincent Flanders started Web Pages That Suck. Things like Mystery Meat Navigation are almost gone entirely, as modern websites embrace more minimal designs and are often built on foundations such as Bootstrap or Material Design.

However, after a series of very frustrating experiences today while trying to buy a mobile phone, I am convinced that the state of professionally-built websites has not really improved. Websites may have converged to similar designs that overall are less painful, but the user experience is still miserable because of a lack of professionalism.

As a result, although I would have preferred not to continue this series, I feel there is still value in doing so. In this article, we will focus on websites of companies that sell mobile phones in Malta, where the technology and customer service are both still very medieval.

Sound Machine

Let’s start with Sound Machine. When you first visit this site, you get one of those cookie notices at the bottom-left. That’s pretty normal, especially in the GDPR era.

However, part of this notice sticks around even after you close it. It’s particularly noticeable if you scroll down so that the background is uniformly dark:

This is pretty strange, and probably unintended. But wait… do you notice something in that dark footer area? That’s right — this website was made by none other than Cyberspace Solutions, to which I had dedicated an entire article 3 years ago. I guess this explains a lot.

Another little mistake can be found in their Cookie Policy, where someone has been a little careless with their HTML tags:

But the worst blunder of all is that the Contact form does not even work:

In fact, when you press the Send button, a spinner runs next to it and never stops. There is no indication of the failure, unless you open the Developer Console, which most people obviously will not know how to do.

The result of this is a poor user experience, because (a) the form does not work, (b) there is no indication that anything failed, and, to make matters worse, (c) there is no email address given as an alternative. A customer therefore has no option other than to give them a call or show up in person, which many prefer to avoid for various reasons.

The takeaway from this is that when you build a website, you should always double-check to make sure things look right and that things actually work. Customers aren’t very happy when they don’t.

Direct Vision

Direct Vision has a nice e-commerce website where you can look for products and eventually buy them online. Let’s say I’m interested in the Samsung Galaxy A40… I get a lot of options:

Let’s take a look at the black phone on the left:

Great! It seems to be in stock!

Except that… it isn’t! It turns out that this phone is not available at all in one of their shops, and in the other, it’s only available in a couple of colours (Coral and White). The black one, as it turns out, is not in stock. They need to order it.

So why do they say that it is in stock when it isn’t? The salesgirl tried to give a dumb explanation, and also suggested I go with one of the other colours and get a cover to hide the undesired colour. Naturally, I didn’t buy that (pun intended). It’s truly shameful to waste people’s time in this way.

Tablets and More

Tablets and More is another consumer electronics store. Browsing around, it’s easy to notice a few things out of place. For instance, the thing at the bottom left that fails to load:

…and which, after a few seconds, becomes something else but still fails to explain what it’s supposed to be:

Even the product descriptions seem to be a real mess…

…in what appears to be a copy & paste job from GSM Arena:

What shall we say, then, about the creepy practices of harvesting people’s email addresses via the live chat feature (something that is becoming increasingly common in live chat products nowadays) or of not displaying prices and expecting people to get in touch to find out how much an item costs?

It’s almost as if this store is intentionally doing everything it can to keep customers away.

Phone Box

The minute you land at Phone Box, you can immediately tell that something is wrong:

If a site isn’t being served over HTTPS, then it’s possible for requests to be intercepted by a man in the middle and arbitrary responses served as a result, as Troy Hunt demonstrates in his article about HSTS. This is particularly risky for websites that require you to submit information, and Phone Box does indeed fall in this category:

As I’ve written ad nauseam throughout the Sorry State of the Web series, it is not okay to accept login credentials insecurely over HTTP. While other information being sent insecurely may or may not fall under GDPR and Data Protection laws, I think we would be a lot more comfortable if such details (such as one’s personal address) are not leaked to the world.

At least, this site does not take credit card details, since the only payment method available is cash upon delivery. Let’s hope they don’t decide to accept credit cards as a new feature.

Conclusion

Even from a small sample of websites, we have seen a range of issues going from simple negligent oversights to serious security problems and broken features. In 2020, businesses are still paying a lot of money for web design agencies to do a half-assed job. They probably do not realise how much business they are losing as a result.

How can we make things better? I have a few ideas.

  • Web design agencies: test your website’s functionality and content thoroughly. Get up to speed with the latest security and data protection requirements, as there may be legal repercussions if you don’t.
  • Businesses: choose very carefully who to work with when building a website. Take a look at their past work, and get a second opinion if you don’t feel you can evaluate it. Make it easy for customers to reach you and give them a good service. Otherwise, don’t complain that you are losing business to online marketplaces such as Amazon.
  • Customers: do not buy from businesses that have insecure websites, shady practices, or salespeople who think you’re stupid. Things will only change when they notice that their behaviour is detrimental to their own survival.

The State of Drag and Drop in Linux

A few months ago, looking for a replacement for Windows (which always finds new ways to get on my nerves), I spent a couple of weeks playing with Linux Mint with MATE desktop. During this test drive, one of the annoyances I came across was the inability to drag a URL from Chromium’s address bar to create a link on the desktop. I literally ended up asking for help, and still didn’t figure it out.

Creating a URL shortcut on a Windows 10 desktop by dragging the padlock icon in Chrome

In Windows, this is something I’ve been doing for many, many years. It’s not rocket science. You drag the padlock icon next to the address bar onto your desktop and a shortcut is created, pointing to that URL.

Ubuntu 19.10

Since Ubuntu 19.10 was released a week and a half ago, I thought I’d try it out. The first thing I figured I’d make sure was that I could drag and drop links to the desktop. Ubuntu is one of the most popular and mature operating systems around. Surely they’d support such a basic usability feature, right?

Ubuntu 19.10 doesn’t let you drag links to the desktop.

Well, it turns out that dragging links from default browser Firefox to the desktop has no effect whatsoever. Odd, isn’t it? Let’s try dragging that link to some other folder instead.

We try dragging a link from Firefox to the Documents folder
“Drag and drop is not supported. An invalid drag type was used.”

That’s annoying. I mean, drag and drop is a really basic feature that has been around forever. Let’s try dragging a file from one folder to another… obviously that’s going to work, no?

It looks like it’s going to work, but it doesn’t.

As you drag the file, a little plus icon appears beneath the hand as if to tell you that something’s going to happen. Alas, however, this also has no effect.

And of course, dragging the file to the desktop similarly does not work:

Dragging the file to the desktop has no effect

So we can’t drag links from Firefox, and we can’t drag and drop files. Maybe we’ll have better luck with Chromium?

We try dragging a link from Chromium into the Documents folder
Once again, we get that “Drag and drop is not supported” failure.

So it seems, like someone hinted in that original question about drag and drop in Linux Mint, that this has nothing to do with the browser and is something related to the desktop environment.

Once again, I had to swallow that feeling of incompetence and ask for help with this. Aside from the usual Stack Overflow treatment of getting my question closed as a duplicate, one of the comments led to other Q&As that uncovered a bitter truth: that drag and drop support was intentionally removed. Why would anyone in their right state of mind do that?

Kubuntu 19.10

Incredulous, I decided to try the KDE flavour of Ubuntu — Kubuntu. Drag and drop a link from browser to desktop? No problem:

We drag the padlock icon next to the address bar to the desktop
A context menu appears, asking what we want to do with the URL. “Link Here” creates the equivalent of a desktop shortcut in Windows.
An icon is created on the desktop, leading to the webpage we wanted to keep track of.

Was that really so hard? I get it, there were reasons why GNOME decided to do away with desktop icons and the like. But surely there are better ways to solve the problem than to do away with a basic and essential usability feature.

A desktop environment without basic drag and drop support in… almost 2020… is just garbage.

On Stack Overflow

love Stack Overflow. As a software developer, I think it is one of the most important and useful resources ever made, helping me quickly resolve countless issues in my work and side projects.

I also hate it with a passion, and think it can be a royal pain in the ass. My main reasons for this stem from the community, especially those with moderation powers, being made up of a bunch of kids (not necessarily in the physical sense) who are addicted to the gamification system and will do anything to ramp up their reputation.

Given that I ask about as many questions as I answer, the result was that I have seen many of my legitimate questions closed and/or downvoted for various reasons such as “not constructive” or “duplicate”. Many times, the people casting such judgement would not actually understand the question.

One of my biggest frustrations with the site came when I asked the question “Task.Factory.FromAsync with CancellationTokenSource“. A troll with very high reputation (read: mod_powers++) marked this question as a duplicate of another question which had nothing to do with mine. When I challenged him, he went as far as to edit the unrelated question such that it did answer my question. He actually admitted this in the comments to my question (which have by now been cleaned up by moderators after I reported the matter, but I have conveniently kept screenshots), and even asked me to offer a bounty so that he could get more points:

As a regular user of Stack Overflow, I was highly put off at not being able to ask any reasonable question without it being closed down.

Answering questions is just as frustrating. Typically, when a question is asked, a barrage of short, two-sentence answers will appear. These will be progressively edited into better answers, but as long as they can get something in initially, they will start accumulating points. This is a common tactic and discourages spending the time to write well-thought answers for relatively little reward. Not that I believe that the reward system is more important than the quality of the questions and answers. But alas, many people do, and that is the reason for this sort of phenomenon.

And you can tell that something is really messed up when you get entire courses, such as this 6-hour Pluralsight course, explaining how to use something that is supposed to be a Q&A site.

But in fact, what I am describing is nothing new, and has been going on for many years. In fact, around 2013, Michael Richter wrote a very informative post about the problems plaguing Stack Overflow. It has disappeared from its original location, but can still be read (along with around a couple of weeks’ worth of comments) thanks to the Internet Archive.

I am reproducing Mr. Richter’s article below for ease of future reference. Aside from the issues with Stack Overflow, I would also like to emphasise the story around his “goto” answer, which reverberates a problem I encounter extremely regularly with developers being too religious about what they have been taught, and not using their head to adequately reason about techniques in the particular context they need.

Update 1st June 2019: “Why StackOverflow sucks” is another interesting example of moderator abuse on the site.

Without further ado…

“Why I no longer contribute to StackOverflow” by Michael Richter

I was active in the StackOverflow (and the broader Stack Exchange) community for a while. I no longer am. Here’s why.

Introduction

I have an account at StackOverflow. Follow the link and check out a few stats:

  • I’ve been a member for almost four years at the time I’m writing this.
  • I’ve scored over 14,000 points in their gaming system.
  • I’m in the top 3% of their contributors overall as of this writing.

I point this out not to brag but to make sure it’s clear that I’m not writing this because of “sour grapes” or because I’m not getting the recognition I think I deserve. Indeed, to be blunt, I’m getting way too much recognition, but more on that below.

Overview

If you’re a software developer of any kind, and if you haven’t been sleeping under a rock, you know of Joel Spolsky and Jeff Atwood’s StackOverflow (and broader StackExchange ecosystem). For the rest of you, allow me to lift up your rock a little and explain what the site is.

In brief, you ask questions related to programming and other people answer them. The site is “gamified” (what an utterly horrendous neologism, that!) so you score points for asking questions that get voted up, answering questions and getting voted up, for doing book-keeping tasks and a variety of other things. You can also earn “badges” (gold, silver and bronze) for accomplishing certain things.

The intent of the system is to provide some form of recognition for people who help others with software development problems. It sounds innocuous, but in the end I find it vaguely distasteful and off-putting.

I’ve been asked more than a few times now why I think this, so today I will commit my explanations in writing once so I can just point to this page instead of repeatedly saying the same thing.

The problems

The problems I see with StackOverflow are summarized in this list:

  1. Poor pedagogy
  2. Poor reward system
  3. Poor community

I’m willing to engage in discussion of any of these flaws. Comments are turned on for this post. They are, however, moderated so if you plan to simply spew bile at someone who dares say bad things about a site you like you:

  • won’t get your 15 seconds of Innarwebs Fame™®;
  • will add to this counter of people who contribute to point #3 above: count so far: 6

Poor pedagogy

As an educator, I find the StackOverflow approach to “helping” people unproductive and contrary to any kind of real learning. For illustration, go back and take a look at my profile. Specifically take a look at the tags tab. See the #1 tag there? Java. Most of my answers (and most of my points) come from Java-related questions.

Now comes a confession.

I’m not a Java programmer. I’ve only ever briefly programmed in Java professionally. I hated the experience and I hate the language. I certainly don’t consider myself a Java expert. Yet I managed to get the bulk of my points from Java. How is this possible?

It’s possible because I did what many of the people whose questions I answered (and got points for) should have done for themselves: I saw a simple Java question, hit Google, read briefly, then synthesized an original answer.

There’s an old cliché in English: give a man a fish, he eats for a day; teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime. StackOverflow is filled to the brim with people giving fishes. The people asking are learning nothing useful beyond the shortest of the short terms and the people teaching are not helping in any but the most trivial of ways. In the long term, I submit, StackOverflow is probably holding back the development of programmers (and thus the entire field of programming).

Poor reward system

Incidentally, my #2 tag is C++. There was a time I would cheerfully have called myself a C++ expert. These days I still likely know more about the language than most people working in it, but I have, if it’s at all possible, an even deeper abiding hatred of the language than I do for Java.

So why, if I hate Java and C++ (and several other languages that score well on my tags list), do I bother answering questions on those topics? This is because of the second problem I have with StackOverflow: the reward system is ludicrously designed.

The high school “cool kids table”

The very nature of StackOverflow’s structure has it such that only those who answer simple questions of the most popular programming languages will get a reward. To illustrate this, look at the difference between this Java-related answer and this non-Java one.

The Java answer scored me 460 and took me probably under a minute to write. The one about operating systems scored me 60 points and likely took about fifteen minutes to write.

If you’re going for points (and that’s the entire raison d’être for gamification!), are you going to waste time like that for 60 points when you could fit in a dozen 460-point answers? Of course not! You’re going to go wherever the points are, And the points are the low-hanging fruit of trivial questions from popular languages. The way StackOverflow is structured rewards people who put as little work as possible across as many simple questions as possible within only the most popular segments. Spending thought (and thus time) on answers interferes with points- and badge-mongering. Answering questions outside of the top ten languages similarly interferes.

This “cool kids table” problem has a very real effect. Look again at my profile. 218 answers. 10 questions. Why is this? I could arrogantly claim that this is because I know more than everybody else, but the real reason is that getting answers on any question that requires thought is a non-starter. As my approach to scoring points (Google + hasty rewrite) shows, I’m quite adept at answering trivial questions myself. For a prime example of the problem, consider this question. It got five answers (one of which you probably can’t see), only one of which even really answered part of the question. Why? Because answering the whole question would have taken a lot more work than most people in StackOverflow would be willing to put in. There’s just no percentage in spending time on difficult questions when you can hoover up a cool thousand points in a fraction of the time.

Broken scoring

Even if the “cool kids table” wasn’t an issue at StackOverflow, the system is still largely broken. Remember how I have over 14,000 points as of this writing? Two years and a bit ago, when I decided to stop participating in StackOverflow, this was not the case. I was “only” at OVER NINE THOUSAND! and several hundred points shy of getting moderator status. In well over two years I have contributed nothing to StackOverflow: no questions, no answers, nothing. (Well, that’s not true. When my score went over 10,000 I tried out the moderator powers for a couple of edits, just to test them out.) Over one third of my reputation was “earned” from me doing absolutely nothing for over two years. Indeed I went from the top 4% of contributors at my time of departure to the top 3%, despite, you know, me not doing anything.

Any scoring system that allows this to happen is simply broken in my opinion.

Poor community

And now my reputation score will go down!

Petty children

As of this writing my score was, as mentioned above, over 14,000. (14,076 to be precise.) I predict that this is going to go down as more people find out about this blog entry and start voting down my questions and answers in petty revenge. How do I know? I’ve been on the receiving end of sudden bouts of negative votes before. Consider this question about ‘goto’ constructs, for example. As of this writing it has 72 up votes and 13 down votes. It is simultaneously one of my most popular answers as well as one of my most hated ones.

The people who hated it weren’t content, however, with merely voting it down. No, after I posted that answer I had a mysterious downward turn in my reputation as downvotes appeared all over my answers. People got so upset at my mocking one of the Holy of Holies of computing that it wasn’t enough to just downvote the answer, they had to punish me. (Their selected means of punishment was as highly amusing as it was highly ineffective.) This is not the way a community of mature users acts.

Creeping authoritarianism

That kind of behaviour is, of course, inevitable in any kind of Innarwebs™® interaction. Pseudo-anonymity makes doorknobs of otherwise-normal people. There is something else, however, in the whole Stack Exchange hierarchy that bugs me: the creeping authoritarianism.

The “flavour” of StackOverflow today is entirely different than the flavour it had when I started. When I started the community as a whole still had a bit of a sense of humour. Sure sometimes questions and/or answers would be a bit off-topic or a bit irreverent, but it gave more of a community feel that way, even if it was on occasion less-than-“professional”.

This changed slowly but surely in the way that all “community moderated” things change. Here is the recipe that all such “community-driven” approaches almost, but not quite, invariably follow:

  1. A wide-open community based on “merit” is built.
  2. The community gets a kernel of users who build up “merit” by virtue of, basically, being obsessive twerps.
  3. As this kernel of “serious” users builds up its influence, they start to modify what the standards of the community are to match their own desires.
  4. These standards get enforced on other members of the community who lack sufficient “merit” (read: who have a life outside the site) to fight back.
  5. The tenor of the community changes to match the notions of the obsessive, but “meritous” minority.
  6. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

This happened at Wikipedia and it’s happened at StackOverflow. StackOverflow was once fun. It is no longer. StackOverflow once had a tolerance for things a little outside of the norm. It does no longer.

Take a look at the site now. Some of the most popular questions and/or answers are now locked down and only kept for “historical reasons”. Consider this answer. It’s likely the best-known and most-loved answer on the entire damned site! It’s funny and it’s informative. But it’s something that makes the current powers-that-be at the site crazy and thus it is locked and we have this ominous note appended: “This post has been locked while disputes about its content are being resolved.”

What. The. Fuck!?

TL;DR

There are a number of reasons why I stopped contributing to StackOverflow. I am disquieted by its poor pedagogical value, I think its scoring system is fundamentally broken and rewards the wrong things, and I think its community lacks maturity even while it becomes more and more pointlessly authoritarian. So what would I recommend as an alternative?

How about learning? You know, that thing that puts information in your head that you can apply later at need. Use Google. Use Wikipedia (if you must). Use RosettaCode for code examples. (Contribute there too!) Engage with other users of the tools you use in the form of user groups, mailing lists, web forums, etc. Learn foundational principles instead of answers to immediate questions.

On Daily Standup Meetings

Agile development methodologies such as Scrum, Kanban and XP have taken the software development industry by storm. By now, most companies have drunk the kool-aid – first the decision-makers, then the developers – and follow it with a manner of religious zeal.

It seems like this exciting new “agile” way of working has made traditional hierarchical management and reporting lines obsolete. Agile has by now entrenched itself deeply within the fabric of software companies, and it seems like we’ve forgotten the old ways.

We are now faced with the conflict of fixed-backlog sprints and shifting requirements, burndown charts that never converge, armies of full-time scrum masters babysitting developers to death, and the progression (or regression) of the Daily Scrum into… the Daily Standup Meeting.

While I understand this article may be controversial and may touch a nerve in a large number of people, I find it much more important to work efficiently and to challenge harmful norms than to mindlessly conform to them. My hope is that at least some people might read this article with an open mind, break out of their stupor, and start questioning these established practices. In order to improve, it is necessary to first acknowledge problems, and then take active steps towards addressing them.

What is the Daily Standup Meeting?

Image credit: taken from here

The Daily Standup Meeting is a “ritual” (quoting Jason Yip’s comprehensive article on the topic) in which the development team (and possibly other stakeholders) gathers to report on the progress of each individual member. They must in turn answer three questions:

  • What did you do yesterday?
  • What are you going to do today?
  • Are there any obstacles hindering your progress?

Let’s take a look at the meaning of each word, aside from “Meeting” which is obvious enough. As a “Daily” meeting, this happens routinely every day at a specific time. All those involved must stop what they are doing and participate, whether it is productive or not.

What I have just described is nothing new: I have participated in Daily Scrum meetings of this nature for years, and I’m pretty sure this goes back much father than my personal experience can account for.

A more recent twist, though, is the Daily “Standup” Meeting. The idea is to force people to stand up in order to keep meetings short, by having the physical discomfort as a disincentive to letting the meetings drag on unnecessarily.

Standing Up

This factor, on its own, speaks volumes. Rather than solving the problem of pointless meetings that are a complete waste of time, we choose to make people feel uncomfortable in the hope that the meetings will be kept short.

The first problem with this is how ridiculous and humiliating it is. Not even in church are you obliged to stand up, and perhaps at school there may have been instances where some posture was enforced in punishment (a practice that is probably considered barbaric by today’s standards).

But no. We are fully grown adults, who have been working for several years in the industry, and there is a perfectly comfortable sofa behind us, but we cannot use it, under pain of menacing glares from everybody in the room.

This also has no regard for any physical issues that the participants may be undergoing that may make this practice more uncomfortable than for the average human being. Such people should not have to disclose their personal problems to the team in order to waive the enforcement of a certain posture on the job, something that nobody has the right to enforce in the first place.

The second problem is that, well, it doesn’t work. Standing up or not, the tendency to ramble on is a lot more powerful than the discomfort (which most people can just as well get used to). Which brings us to the next section.

Excessively Long Standups

Do you remember what we’re supposed to do in standups? Basically, answer the following three questions, and then get on with our work:

  • What did you do yesterday?
  • What are you going to do today?
  • Are there any obstacles hindering your progress?

It is much harder than you would think, to stick to the plan. Despite having been brainwashed into enthusiastic and excited participation in this drudgery, people’s overexcitement tends to take over. There are many different scenarios which result in deviation from this template, and in turn cause Daily Standup Meetings to drag on. These are just a few of the most common I’ve encountered:

  • People want to justify their job and show that they are doing something, so they read out a whole list of every little detail they worked on since the last Daily Standup Meeting.
  • Stakeholders ask a lot of questions to the development team. They have a right to be answered, but the Daily Standup Meeting is not the right place.
  • Developers going off on a tangent and having a technical (or other) discussion between two or three people, but keeping everyone in the room.
  • Lots of people in the room, so it takes a while to go through what everyone has to report. This is mainly a problem when developer teams are large, but it can also be a result of participation of a lot of stakeholders who join the Standup. With 20 people in the room, it’s hard to keep meetings efficient.

Broadcasting Information

The format of the Daily Standup Meeting is such that the development team and any other stakeholders are present (whether physically or otherwise). It allows everybody in the room to be kept up to date with progress (in theory) and to be able to help remove any obstacles (again, in theory).

Personally, I believe that this is one of those cases where too much transparency is a bad thing. The main reason for this is that there is no reason why each person should need to broadcast their progress to so many people in the room. Typically, you work with one or two direct colleagues, and report to your manager. There is no need to keep a whole crowd in the loop.

Rather than focusing on what each of us needs to do, we instead feel the urge to get involved in what the whole team is up to. A consequence of this is that it becomes necessary to involve everybody in the team in order to take the slightest technical decision, which is really the opposite of the empowerment that should be enabled by giving developers such autonomy.

In practice, keeping everyone on the team updated has no real benefit. They may know you’re working on something, but they would not understand the business or technical decisions, and as a result, they would not be able to take up the task you are working on, in your absence.

Another problem is the direct access to the development team from higher-up stakeholders. Part of a manager’s job is to manage expectations, both to his superiors and to his subordinates. And yet, higher-level stakeholders and members now suddenly have full access to the fine details of what the development team is working on.

A real problem here is when members of the development team are cornered into publicly answering uncomfortable questions, possibly by external stakeholders or maybe even by members of their own team. Such things should really go through a manager or scrum master rather than being laid out in a public shit show. It is not uncommon for such meetings to degrade into blame games.

Even in the absence of such situations, it is often uncomfortable for developers to speak (let alone report their progress) in front of a small crowd, even if it consists of their own direct colleagues. While the stereotype of anti-social developers may be questionable, in my experience I have observed that most developers feel intimidated when speaking in front of people, just as they feel uncomfortable when someone (even a direct colleague) sits next to them while they work. It is thus quite easy for developers to go on the defensive if challenged about their work during the Daily Standup Meeting.

And this, of course, is something that should be completely avoided. As any manager worth his salt would know, you should never, ever reprimand someone in front of other people. This is also a fundamental flaw of retrospective meetings, although that is beyond the scope of this article.

Finally, the routine of the Daily Standup Meeting makes it convenient for people to provide updates and feedback during the meeting itself, rather than spontaneously as needed. Communication should be spontaneous and immediate; that is what keeps things efficient.

A trend I have seen is for companies with poor communication to turn to agile ceremonies to try to resolve the problem. Little do they realise that they are making it worse by adding more ritual baggage and introducing more middlemen. There is no substitute for real and effective communication.

What Alternative is There?

Honestly, what was so terrible about the good old system of hierarchical reporting lines? Think about it:

  • You talk directly to your manager when you’ve finished your work and need to work on something new.
  • Your manager can ping you periodically for progress, but otherwise you can focus on your work.
  • If there are impediments, the manager can bring the right people on board.
  • If you need to talk to some direct colleagues (e.g. to integrate with their API), just do so. No need to have the whole team in a meeting for that.
  • Requirements and other outside interferences go through the manager first.
  • Feedback and criticism take place one-on-one with the manager.
  • Each manager reports to their manager. No need for crowds.

That just about solves all the problems I’ve described earlier: notice the contrast of involving only the people who are necessary, as opposed to everyone. The important factors to make this work are having a manager who is organised and has excellent people skills, and that everybody on the team is able to communicate efficiently and effectively.

Agile methodologies will remain a reality for many years to come. But are they really an improvement?

Update 11th September 2017: Here are some reactions to this article on social media (might require login):